Villages around Tideswell Church

Abney


Slideshow
A view of a farm near Abney
A view of a farm near Abney
Abney is a tiny hamlet of a few farms lying in a remote valley high up above the Derwent to the south of Hope Valley. It is beautifully situated and the area around is excellent for walking, with Shatton Edge, Bretton Clough and Eyam Moor all nearby. The settlement was mentioned as 'Habenai' in the Domesday book, so it is very ancient and probably hasn't got much bigger since those times.

On the road down to Hathersage lies Highlow Hall, an Elizabethan manor house and the seat of one of the branches of the Eyre family. A Robert Eyre of Highlow was High Sheriff of Derbyshire at one time. The building is quite distinctive and is reputedly one of the most haunted buildings in Derbyshire, with at least four ghosts.

To the west, on Hucklow Edge, there is the headquarters of the Derbyshire and Lancashire Gliding Club and at weekends gliders are often in the sky above.

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Bretton Clough and Abney Low view
0 - Bretton Clough and Abney Low view
Abney Grange - a typical hill farm
1 - Abney Grange - a typical hill farm
Eyam Moor barrow and view to Hathersage
2 - Eyam Moor barrow and view to Hathersage

Bradwell


Slideshow
Bradwell (or Bradda as it is known locally) owns something of a distinction. A sprawling but interesting collection of old cottages, the village actually retains a significant amount of local industry and is not dependant on tourism. Engineering, quarrying and ice cream-making are all important here but have surprisingly limited impact on the appeal of the settlement they serve.

A view of Hope cement works
A view of Hope cement works
Like many other villages of the area, Bradwell was once an important centre for lead-mining (the 'Bradda Beaver' hat was universally worn in the lead mines in the 19th century) and the moor above the village is scarred by the remains of many mines, some of which are now being worked for Fluorspar.

The discreet charms of Bradwell are fairly well hidden from the average passer-by, for the main part of the village clings to a steep hillside above the main road and can hardly be seen. The centre of the village, which lies above the brook just south of the main road, is a rabbit-warren of tiny cottages and narrow lanes with picturesque names like Soft Water Lane, Hungry Lane and Hollowgate. From here the houses spread right up the hillside, from where there are fine views across the Hope Valley.

Bradwell
Bradwell
Though most of the village dates from the lead-mining era, Bradwell has a long history - the narrow street called Smalldale follows the line of the Roman road between Brough and Buxton. A Saxon earthwork called the Grey Ditch runs from Bradwell Edge to Micklow Hill near the New Bath Hotel, where there is a thermal spring and the remains of a Roman Bath were found.

On the road to Tideswell up Bradwell Dale lies Hazelbadge Hall, one of the oldest houses in the area, which was built in 1549 and still has the arms of the Vernon family on its wall. Bradwell is also noted as the home of Samuel Fox, the inventor of the modern umbrella mechanism. His house is marked with a plaque and lies just off the main street.

Also of interest is the home of Bradwell's Home-made Dairy Ice Cream, in the centre of the village, and Bagshawe Cavern, (open to visitors & adventure caving groups) up the hill to the South.

Brough is a nearby small hamlet on the banks of the River Noe, important in Roman times as the site of the Anavio fort, an important factor in the Roman occupation of the Peak District. Here Batham Gate, the Roman road from Buxton, met the roads from Melandra (near Glossop) and that which came from Sheffield and Doncaster via Stanage edge. On the mound behind the modern hamlet the Romans built a wooden stockade about AD70 and this was replaced by a stone one around AD150. Altars and a commemorative stone from the fort are in the Buxton museum. After about AD200 the fort was only intermittently garrisoned but a settlement grew up around this important road junction.

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Abney Grange - a typical hill farm
0 - Abney Grange - a typical hill farm
Bradwell welldressing
1 - Bradwell welldressing
Bradwell village
2 - Bradwell village
Cement Works, Hope Valley
3 - Cement Works, Hope Valley
Hope Church
4 - Hope Church
Castleton view with Mam Tor behind
5 - Castleton view with Mam Tor behind
Hope Churchyard - Saxon cross
6 - Hope Churchyard - Saxon cross
Bradwell - White Hart Inn
7 - Bradwell - White Hart Inn

Bretton


Slideshow
The Barrel Inn
The Barrel Inn
Bretton is a quiet hamlet high up on a gritstone ridge which rears up steeply above the limestone plateau below. The view from here is splendid - it is said that on a clear day you can see for 30 miles.

The original turnpike road from Sheffield and Grindleford to Buxton went along this ridge, and an ancient packhorse way from Eyam to Hathersage passed nearby, so it is no surprise that the pub, the Barrel, is dated 1597.

There is a Youth Hostel nearby and the fascinating Bretton Clough and all the great walking it offers is a just over the back of the settlement. Nearby is the radio-masted summit of William Hill, which offers superb 360 degree views of this area of the Peak District.

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Bretton - the Barrel Inn
0 - Bretton - the Barrel Inn
Bretton Clough and Abney Low view
1 - Bretton Clough and Abney Low view
Eyam - brass band in welldressing parade
2 - Eyam - brass band in welldressing parade
Eyam Hall
3 - Eyam Hall
Foolow village green
4 - Foolow village green
Foolow - Waterfall swallet
5 - Foolow - Waterfall swallet

Cressbrook


Slideshow
Cressbrook is located on the River Wye about 4 miles north of Bakewell. It grew up around a cotton mill and consists mainly of former mill cottages, though some of the oldest houses in and around the village are lead miners' cottages, testifying to a history that predates the mill.

Cressbrook Mill
Cressbrook Mill
The mill is still the major building in the village though now it has been converted into apartments. The original mill was built by Sir Richard Arkwright in 1779 but this burnt down in 1785 and was rebuilt by Richard Arkwright Jnr in 1787. A large extension (Wye Mill - Grade II* listed) was commissioned in 1814 and erected by William Newton on behalf on J L Philips and Brother, Cotton Spinners. Newton was a local character whom Anna Seward dubbed 'The Minstrel of the Peak'. Behind the mill are apprentices cottages, older than the current main mill building by several years. These were built to house orphans brought as child apprentices from London to work in the mill.

In 1820 the tiny cottages in Ravensdale (known locally as 'The Wick') were built followed in 1840 the model village of pretty cottages at the top of the hill. The Cressbrook mill owners were generally philanthropic and as well as fine housing they provided piped water pumped up the hill from a spring near the river and they funded the village band, which still survives.

Above the mill is Cressbrook Hall, the house of mill-owner Henry McConnel. The house stands on a bluff overlooking the river and is a fanciful piece of Gothic architecture. The position is superb, with magnificent views down Monsal Dale. Farther up the hill is the rest of the village, for the most part consisting of the cottages once occupied by the millworkers.

The heyday of the mill was the 19th century when it produced high-quality cotton for lacemaking. After World War I all the local mills struggled to make a profit and cotton spinning ceased here in 1965. The mill finally closed in 1971 after which it was allowed to decay for several years before being restored.

The demise of the cotton industry brought great changes to the village. As there is now almost no employment within the village the population has declined and faster transport links have meant that they have been replaced by an influx of older professional people who work within a wide radius of the village. House prices have risen so that local young people can rarely afford them. This has meant that the population has aged - to the extent that the local school closed in 1997, when its roll was down to 6 pupils. A number of the cottages have become second homes or holiday homes, and of course many of these are empty for much of the year.

The scenery around is magnificent. Along the River Wye, just upstream of Cressbrook Mill lies Water-cum-Jolly, a beautiful river gorge with fine limestone cliffs which attract many rock-climbers, bird-watchers, walkers and fishermen. North of the mill lies Cressbrook Dale, or Ravensdale, a fine gorge-like limestone dale with numerous crags and the remains of several lead mines. Most of this dale is a National Nature Reserve renowned for its range of rare flowers.

The village has a fete and well dressing each year in early June.

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Monsal Dale - river Wye
0 - Monsal Dale - river Wye
Monsal Dale
1 - Monsal Dale
Cressbrook Dale
2 - Cressbrook Dale
Cressbrook Mill
3 - Cressbrook Mill
Cressbrook 'New' Houses
4 - Cressbrook 'New' Houses
Cressbrook - Ravens Crag
5 - Cressbrook - Ravens Crag
Litton - Tansley Dale flowers
6 - Litton - Tansley Dale flowers
Litton - Tansley Dale walls
7 - Litton - Tansley Dale walls
Water cum Jolly and Cressbrook millpond
8 - Water cum Jolly and Cressbrook millpond
Water cum Jolly
9 - Water cum Jolly
Water cum Jolly - Cressbrook Hall and millpond
10 - Water cum Jolly - Cressbrook Hall and millpond
Cressbrook mill workers' cottages
11 - Cressbrook mill workers' cottages
Water cum Jolly from the Monsal Trail
12 - Water cum Jolly from the Monsal Trail
Monsal Trail - at Water-cum-Jolly
13 - Monsal Trail - at Water-cum-Jolly

Foolow


Slideshow
Foolow
Foolow
Foolow is a picturesque village clustered around a village green with an ancient cross and duckpond. It was formerly a lead-mining village and many of the houses are from the 17th century. The mere, or pond, is fed by natural springs and the shaft of the village cross is medieval, though the base is more recent and has a bull-baiting ring attached to it. There are no shops but there is a pub, the Bull's Head.

The area around is limestone and the village stands on the 'Foolow Beds'. Huge, deep slabs of Carboniferous limestones that mark the transition from the Dark Peak in the north to the White Peak in the south. There is much evidence of lead-mining locally. There are also some interesting geological features, such as Waterfall Swallet, where one of the local streams disappears underground. This lies along the road to Eyam. To the north the ground rises up to Eyam edge and the landscape changes rapidly to gritstone. The whole surrounding area is a fine one for relatively gentle walks.

Foolow has a well-dressing in late August.

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Bretton - the Barrel Inn
0 - Bretton - the Barrel Inn
Bretton Clough and Abney Low view
1 - Bretton Clough and Abney Low view
Foolow village green
2 - Foolow village green
Foolow - Waterfall swallet
3 - Foolow - Waterfall swallet

Great Hucklow & Little Hucklow


Slideshow
Great Hucklow was once a lead-mining village and one of the former mines beneath the village was afterwards mined for fluorspar. It is now a pretty little village nestling below Hucklow Edge and has become a popular place to live. It was a centre of Unitarianism from the late 17th century and now has a Unitarian Conference Centre.

The village was once famous for its plays, which were written by a local resident, L. du Garde Peach, who lived in what is now the conference centre, and performed in a converted lead-smelting mill. These plays were based on local Derbyshire 'types' and acted by local people - du Garde Peach effectively created his own genre. The theatre ran from 1927 to 1972 and when du Garde Peach died in 1976 the tradition unfortunately died with him.

Above the village, on the plateau behind Hucklow Edge, there is the 'airfield' of the Derbyshire and Lancashire Gliding Club, and most weekends a number of gliders will be airborne overhead.

Great Hucklow has a well-dressing in mid-August.

Near to Great Hucklow are the small hamlets of Windmill, Grindlow and Little Hucklow. The walking around here is gentle and very pleasant with easily followed footpaths crossing old drystone wall field systems while above Great Hucklow there is access into the beautiful Bretton Clough.

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Bretton - the Barrel Inn
0 - Bretton - the Barrel Inn
Abney Grange - a typical hill farm
1 - Abney Grange - a typical hill farm

Litton


Slideshow
Litton is a small village lying 2km East of Tideswell. It is situated in a picturesque area just to the east of Tideswell and the eastern end of the village overlooks Tansley Dale and Ravensdale, a National Nature Reserve. It is a popular area for walkers.

Litton's derivation is as the historical seat of the Lytton family, who settled here shortly after the Norman conquest. Sir Gilbert de Lytton accompanied Richard III on the crusades and his descendants held many sovereign positions including Sir Rowland de Lytton, who served Elizabeth I. Subsequent to the Lyttons the land passed down through the Alsop, Bagshawe, Upton and Statham families as well as Lord Scarsdale.

Litton
Litton
Originally a lead-miners' village, Litton mostly comprises small cottages, though there are some fine large houses and several old buildings, including one house dating from 1639. In the eighteenth century it had a flourishing stocking making industry. There is a village green with an ancient cross and a pair of stocks. In Litton Dale the remnants of an ancient medieval field system, with long narrow fields, may still be seen.

There is a pub, the Red Lion, and a small shop. Litton has a well dressing in late June.


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Tideswell Church
0 - Tideswell Church
Tideswell Church in snow
1 - Tideswell Church in snow
Tideswell Church - the tomb of Thurstan de Bower
2 - Tideswell Church - the tomb of Thurstan de Bower
Tideswell Church - carving by Advent Hunstone
3 - Tideswell Church - carving by Advent Hunstone
Tideswell Church - medieval womens graves
4 - Tideswell Church - medieval womens graves
Litton
5 - Litton
Litton village green
6 - Litton village green
Cressbrook Dale
7 - Cressbrook Dale
Litton - traditional dancing in Wakes week
8 - Litton - traditional dancing in Wakes week
Litton - Tansley Dale flowers
9 - Litton - Tansley Dale flowers
Litton - Tansley Dale walls
10 - Litton - Tansley Dale walls
Tideswell
11 - Tideswell
Cressbrook Dale - view of Peter's Stone
12 - Cressbrook Dale - view of Peter's Stone

Longstone


Slideshow
Longstone is made up of two small villages, Great and Little Longstone. The villages have many fine 18th century cottages, built during an era of prosperity from lead-mining and shoemaking. There is a village green in Great Longstone, with an ancient cross and a nearby manor house which has medieval origins. Across the road is Longstone Hall, originally built during the 14th century, but rebuilt in the mid 18th, with a prominent brick facade. There is a rather nice church hidden round the back of the village.

Great Longstone church
Great Longstone church
There is a shop and two pubs in Great Longstone, the Crispin (patron saint of shoemakers) and The White Lion, while Little Longstone has the Packhorse.

Great Longstone and Little Longstone have well-dressings in late July.

Just along the road, to the west of Little Longstone, is Monsal Head, a famous beauty spot and viewpoint. There is a small car park with a fine view down the valley, and a much larger car park, with public toilets, 100m away. A few hundred metres towards Ashford there is an old Quaker burial ground.

To the north of Longstone lies Longstone Edge, a fine viewpoint for the surrounding countryside. Unfortunately the top of the edge has been intensively quarried for lead and, more recently fluorspar, which has left some impressive holes in the ground but rather detracts from its scenic value.

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Monsal Head Viaduct
0 - Monsal Head Viaduct
Monsal Dale - river Wye
1 - Monsal Dale - river Wye
Monsal Dale
2 - Monsal Dale
Longstone parish church
3 - Longstone parish church
Entrance to Headstone Tunnel below Monsal Head
4 - Entrance to Headstone Tunnel below Monsal Head

Miller's Dale


Slideshow
Miller's Dale was once an important railway junction, where passengers for Buxton joined or left the trains between London and Manchester on the old Midland Railway. Since the railway was closed in 1970 the station has become an important car park and access point to local walks. The hamlet is still dominated by the impressive, massive railway viaducts across the Wye valley here.

Millers Dale view
Millers Dale view
Miller's Dale is an excellent centre from which to explore the gorges of the Wye and the high limestone plateau around it. Ravenstor, towards Litton Mill, is a fearsome overhanging limestone cliff on which local rock climbers practise, and there is more rock-climbing in Cheedale, upstream of Miller's Dale.

Downstream lies Litton Mill, a small hamlet grouped around a former cotton mill on the River Wye. The mill was built in the late 18th century and burned down in 1897 (there is a photograph in the Angler's Rest in Millers Dale), but was then rebuilt. In its early years the mill was known locally and nationally for its harsh treatment of its apprentices, many of whom were orphans both local and from as far away as London. This was the subject of an expose in the form of a book by Robert Blincoe in 1832 which is said to have helped the passage of the Factories Act of 1833 and may have inspired Dickens when he wrote Oliver Twist.

There are two Nature Reserves near Miller's Dale. Priestcliffe Lees and Station Quarry belongs to Derbyshire Naturalists' Trust, while Monk's Dale (a dry tributary valley of the Wye) is a National Nature Reserve. Both are rich in classic limestone flora and fauna of the area.

There is a small church and a pub, the Angler's Arms and 1km away is Ravenstor Youth Hostel.

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Miller's Dale
0 - Miller's Dale
Cressbrook 'New' Houses
1 - Cressbrook 'New' Houses
Miller's Dale - Raven Tor
2 - Miller's Dale - Raven Tor
Water cum Jolly and Cressbrook millpond
3 - Water cum Jolly and Cressbrook millpond
Water cum Jolly
4 - Water cum Jolly
Water cum Jolly - Cressbrook Hall and millpond
5 - Water cum Jolly - Cressbrook Hall and millpond
Cressbrook mill workers' cottages
6 - Cressbrook mill workers' cottages
Water cum Jolly from the Monsal Trail
7 - Water cum Jolly from the Monsal Trail
Monsal Trail - at Water-cum-Jolly
8 - Monsal Trail - at Water-cum-Jolly

Peak Dale


Slideshow
Peak Dale, which is divided almost in two by the former Midland Railway, comprises Upper End on the west side of the railway and Smalldale on the east. Both were built to house quarrymen in the days when the stone was largely hewn from the quarries by hand, and so the settlements are composed mostly of small stone cottages and are surrounded by past, present and future limestone quarries.

Some of the former quarries have been filled in and landscaped, but others have been flooded and are now filled by blue lagoons. Some of the old quarries are used for various sports activities.

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Dove Holes - Bull Ring view
0 - Dove Holes - Bull Ring view
Dove Holes - Bull Ring view
1 - Dove Holes - Bull Ring view

Peak Forest


Slideshow
Peak Forest does not have many trees, for it is named after the Royal Forest of the Peak; a 'forest' being an area set aside for hunting rather than a wooded place. North-west of the village lies Chamber Knowl Farm, where the Swainmote (one of the courts of the Royal Forest) used to meet, but the present building dates from the eighteenth century, long after the forest was abolished.

The Royal Forest originally covered most of the northern half of the Peak District when founded by William the Conquerer, but this area was gradually whittled away by encroachment until only a small area around Peak Forest remained by the 16th century, and the forest was finally abolished in 1674.

The current church dates only from the late 19th century, but the church on this site has an interesting history. It was founded in 1657 by the Countess of Devonshire (at a time when the Commonwealth had forbidden church-building), and is one of a very few in the country dedicated to Charles the King and Martyr - so it is clear where the Devonshires' sympathies lay! Until the late eighteenth century the vicar had the right to conduct marriages between 'any persons', 'from anywhere' and 'at any time'. The village hence became a sort of local Gretna Green.

A less accessible feature of Peak Forest is Eldon Hole, one of the seven wonders of the Peak. It is the deepest local pothole; an alarming, evil-looking chasm in the side of Eldon Hill to the north of the village. Access from the village is via Eldon Lane, and is a half-hour walk. The hole is approximately 60 metres deep, but was probably once much deeper, having been part-filled by stones over the years. It was first descended in 1780 and is now quite regularly descended by potholers. Near to Edlon Hill is Starvehouse Moor, a very interesting area and one of the few Limestone Heaths that can be found in the Peak District. Here you will find the curious phenomenon of heather growing on limestone. Made possible by the acid nature of the Loess soils in which it grows.

The village has a shop and a pub, the Devonshire Arms. There is a well-dressing in mid-July.

Eldon Hole, Peak Forest
0 - Eldon Hole, Peak Forest

Taddington


Slideshow
Taddington is clustered around an ancient well on the north side of a ridge formed by a sill of Dolerite in the surrounding limestone. It is one of the highest villages in the area.

The church is mostly 14th century and has an enigmatic decorated shaft in the churchyard. The origins of the shaft are obscure, but it dates from at least Norman times.

Taddington
Taddington
About 2km West of the village, on the escarpment lies Five Wells chambered cairn. This is the highest megalithic tomb in England and must have been an impressive construction on this high point before it was eroded by the elements and robbed for stone. It is a superb viewpoint, with a magnificent view over the surrounding area. Twelve burials were found in the tomb when it was excavated.

At the eastern, lower end of the village (known as Town End), is a pub, the Queen's Arms, and outside the village on the A6 lies the Waterloo Hotel. Taddington has a well-dressing in mid-August.

Blackwell and Priestcliffe are two hamlets of a dozen houses each, sited between Taddington and the River Wye. Most of the dwellings are active farms.

The area below Blackwell, between it and the River Wye, has a series of ridges and terraces in the fields which are the remnants of a Britano-Roman field system, dating from around 400 AD. This was centred around a fortified settlement on the top of Chee Tor, overlooking the River Wye.

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Taddington - Five Wells chambered cairn
0 - Taddington - Five Wells chambered cairn
Miller's Dale
1 - Miller's Dale
Monsal Dale view from Sheldon
2 - Monsal Dale view from Sheldon
Miller's Dale - Raven Tor
3 - Miller's Dale - Raven Tor
Taddington view
4 - Taddington view
Taddington church
5 - Taddington church
Water cum Jolly
6 - Water cum Jolly
Water cum Jolly - Cressbrook Hall and millpond
7 - Water cum Jolly - Cressbrook Hall and millpond
Water cum Jolly from the Monsal Trail
8 - Water cum Jolly from the Monsal Trail
Monsal Trail - at Water-cum-Jolly
9 - Monsal Trail - at Water-cum-Jolly

Tideswell


Slideshow
Tideswell Church
Tideswell Church
Tideswell (known locally as 'Tidza') is one of the most ancient settlements in the central Peak District and was granted a charter for a market in 1251 - these were held regularly until relatively recently. It was the site of the 'Great Courts' of the Royal Forest of the Peak in the time of Edward I and a few of the buildings along the main street have foundations which date from this period. However the major feature from the medieval era is the magnificent 14th-century church, known locally as 'The Cathedral of the Peak'.

This fine church was funded by the local wool trade and by lead mining - for Tideswell was a major centre for the lead-mining industry from medieval times to the nineteenth century. As the mining declined from 1850 onwards so did the population of the village and it has only started to recover in recent years.

Wheston Cross
Wheston Cross
The village still has a range of shops, cafes and pubs.

The nearby hamlet of Wheston is one of the smallest hereabouts with about 15 houses, mostly farms, and a hall which is reputedly haunted. There is an agricultural supplier here but no shops or amenities.

The main point of interest is the fine, recently restored 15th-century cross just on the western edge of the hamlet. Unusually, the cross is essentially complete despite its age. It is thought it once marked the boundary of the Royal Forest and has the Virgin Mary on one side and Christ crucified on the other.

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Tideswell Church
0 - Tideswell Church
Tideswell Church in snow
1 - Tideswell Church in snow
Tideswell Church - the tomb of Thurstan de Bower
2 - Tideswell Church - the tomb of Thurstan de Bower
Tideswell Church - carving by Advent Hunstone
3 - Tideswell Church - carving by Advent Hunstone
Tideswell Church - medieval womens graves
4 - Tideswell Church - medieval womens graves
Litton
5 - Litton
Litton village green
6 - Litton village green
Litton - traditional dancing in Wakes week
7 - Litton - traditional dancing in Wakes week
Litton - Tansley Dale walls
8 - Litton - Tansley Dale walls
Tideswell
9 - Tideswell
Wheston mediaeval cross
10 - Wheston mediaeval cross
Wheston mediaeval cross obverse
11 - Wheston mediaeval cross obverse

Wardlow


Slideshow
Wardlow is a small farming and former lead-mining village strung out along a road which follows the route of the Portway, an ancient Iron Age track that ran from Southern Derbyshire to the great Iron Age fort on Mam Tor. Later adopted by the Romans to reach thier fort at Navio, near Brough, the road is still called Castlegate but known locally as 'Scratter'.

The village layout, with farms spaced out along the through road, has probably changed little since Saxon times.

The area around is dotted with relics of the local lead-mines, which were numerous and extended into nearby Cressbrook Dale and Ravensdale and towards Longstone. The village provides excellent access to Cressbrook Dale National Nature Reserve and Longstone Edge, one of the few Limestone Heaths in the Peak District. There is a pub and a roadside cafe at Wardlow Mires.

Wardlow has a well-dressing in early September.


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Cressbrook Dale
0 - Cressbrook Dale
Cressbrook Mill
1 - Cressbrook Mill
Cressbrook - Ravens Crag
2 - Cressbrook - Ravens Crag
Litton - Tansley Dale flowers
3 - Litton - Tansley Dale flowers
Lead mine shaft heads near Wardlow
4 - Lead mine shaft heads near Wardlow
Cressbrook Dale - view of Peter's Stone
5 - Cressbrook Dale - view of Peter's Stone

Wormhill


Slideshow
Wormhill is a small farming village found to the north of Chee Dale and west of Tideswell. The manor house, Wormhill Hall, was built in 1697 and then heavily restored in the late 19th century. The hamlet was relatively much more important in Norman times than it is today for it was once one of the administrative centres of the Royal Forest of the Peak.

Just to the west, the hamlet of Tunstead was the birthplace of Thomas Brindley who was apprenticed as a millwright but became a famous civil engineer and was responsible for the design and construction of the Bridgewater Canal. In the centre of Wormhill the village well is dedicated to Brindley. The well is 'dressed' each year in late August or early September.

In Great Rocks Dale, to the west of Wormhill, lies Tunstead quarry. Probably the largest quarry in Europe. Quarrying originally took place on the Western side of the Dale, but the owners (ICI at the time, now Buxton Lime Industries) obtained permission in 1978 to begin quarrying on the East side, working towards Wormhill. Vast numbers of trees have been planted to screen the future quarry workings and these can be seen to the west of Wormhill village. The quarrying will eventually completely remove the hamlet of Tunstead, which is already largely deserted and gives some idea of the long-term threat the quarry poses for the environment of this area.

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Blackwell Mill cottages
0 - Blackwell Mill cottages
Cheedale
1 - Cheedale
Cheedale - Plum Buttress
2 - Cheedale - Plum Buttress
Cheedale stepping stones
3 - Cheedale stepping stones
Great Rocks Dale
4 - Great Rocks Dale
Miller's Dale
5 - Miller's Dale
Miller's Dale - Raven Tor
6 - Miller's Dale - Raven Tor

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